We are moving our current databases into a new interface. While we migrate you may experience some technical difficulties.
Thank you for your patience!

Image Archives
New Search | Search Request = [workers] | Edit this search
View pages of thumbnail results 1* 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... next>
< previous record | Displaying record 14 of 3253 hits | next record >
New Search | Search Request = [workers] | Edit this search
< previous record | Displaying record 14 of 3253 hits | next record >
Center the Description... - Center the Image...
14 of 3253 - Center the Image... | Order a copy of this image

Collection: Marvin D. Boland Collection     Series: G73.1-029         (Unique: 33160)
Date: ca. 1918
Description: Puget Mill Co. New England style "Saltbox" houses for company employees in Port Gamble, circa. 1918. Company officials insisted on a hierarchy in housing; managers had the best homes on the highest ground, skilled workers and their families came next, immigrant workers (Scandinavian, German, Swiss, Slovaks and Greeks) arriving in the 1880's were housed on the other side of the second growth forest west and south of the town in areas known as "New England" and "Murphy's Row," unmarried men lived in bunk houses and cabins on the spit near the mill and Chinese workers lived separately out of town, as did native Americans workers. The worker housing was surrounded by picket fences and had fireplaces, electric lights, bathrooms and a water closet. Rent for a three bedroom was about $7.00 a month. (Historylink.org) Boland #21
Subjects: Lumber industry--Port Gamble; Puget Mill Co. (Port Gamble);
Image type: Black & White
Print type: Fiber base-Glossy
Print format: 8x10"
Rights: See Tacoma Public Library for specific rights and permissions.
New Search | Search Request = [workers] | Edit this search
View pages of thumbnail results 1* 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... next>
< previous record | Displaying record 14 of 3253 hits | next record >
New Search | Search Request = [workers] | Edit this search
< previous record | Displaying record 14 of 3253 hits | next record >