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New Search | Search Request = [subjects contains Weyerhaeuser Timber Co. and Tacoma ] | Edit this search
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Displaying thumbnails 1 to 20 of 23 hits
New Search | Search Request = [subjects contains Weyerhaeuser Timber Co. and Tacoma ] | Edit this search
Displaying thumbnails 1 to 20 of 23 hits
D65009-3
Date: 02-21-19521 of 23:
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Series: D65009   Image#: 3   Date: 02-21-1952
Walter J. DeLong was director of public information for the Weyerhaeuser Company. He was reared in Newport, Washington, and his first job was as a water boy for the Fidelity Lumber Company in 1911. Mr. DeLong served with the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I and then joined the Washington National Guard and worked for the Hillyard Lumber Company and other Spokane firms. His military career ranged from 1918 to 1947 and from a private in World War I to Brigadier General as Washington State Adjutant General during World War II, when he also served as state director of selective service. After his release from active duty, he joined Weyerhaeuser in Tacoma as director of public information. He moved to Spokane after he retired from Weyerhaeuser in 1963. He died in November 1969 at the age of 71. (TNT, 11/13/1969)
D155701-35R
Date: 02-04-19692 of 23:
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Series: D155701   Image#: 35R   Date: 02-04-1969
Weyerhaeuser Co. executives concluded the three day meeting in 1969 of sales managers from across the country with a banquet believed to have been held at the Winthrop Hotel. Signs promoting the "Big W Home Coming" were prominently displayed throughout the room. Nearly 100 sales managers had gathered to celebrate the solid year of sales from the wood products group. (TNT 2-2-69, B-8)
A7271-1
Date: 05-00-19383 of 23:
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Series: A7271   Image#: 1   Date: 05-00-1938
Weyerhaeuser Timber Company banquet at the Winthrop Hotel. Men and women seated at tables, some wearing leis. (filed with Argentum)
D88079-9
Date: 01-21-19554 of 23:
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Series: D88079   Image#: 9   Date: 01-21-1955
Informal office photograph of Charles H. Ingram, Vice-president and General Manager of Weyerhaeuser Timber Co. When Phil Weyerhaeuser arrived in Tacoma in 1933 as the company's chief executive officer after the death of George S. Long, who had operated as manager since its 1900 beginning, he inherited a very capable office staff. Ingram was assistant manager, he was promoted to manager in 1936 and became Weyerhaeuser's right hand man. They were the perfect complement, Ingram's attention to detail giving Weyerhaeuser the freedom to look to the future. ("Phil Weyerhaeuser Lumberman" by Charles E. Twining)
D88074-8
Date: 01-20-19555 of 23:
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Series: D88074   Image#: 8   Date: 01-20-1955
Informal office photos of John Philip (Phil) Weyerhaeuser Jr., President of Weyerhaeuser Timber Company, with the oil painting of Frederick Weyerhaeuser, founder of the company. Executive offices of the company were located on the 10th floor of the Tacoma Building, 1017-1021 A St. The company was founded in 1900 with the purchase of 900,000 acres of Washington timberlands from the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. Weyerhaeuser now owns in excess of 1.6 million acres of timberland in Washington, with 4 million acres located elsewhere in the U.S. In 1971, the company moved its corporate headquarters to Federal Way. Phil Weyerhaeuser guided the company from 1933 until his death in 1956 and oversaw its transition from a dealer in timberlands to a manufacturer of forest products and a manager of renewable tree farms. Central to this change was his vision that the only way for a forest products company to operate was to own its own renewable timberlands. ("Phil Weyerhaeuser Lumberman" by Charles E. Twining)
D88074-4
Date: 01-20-19556 of 23:
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Series: D88074   Image#: 4   Date: 01-20-1955
Informal office photos of John Philip (Phil) Weyerhaeuser Jr., President of Weyerhaeuser Timber Company. Executive offices were located on the 10th floor of the Tacoma Building, 1017-1021 A St. The company came into being in 1900 when Frederick Weyerhaeuser and several of his colleagues agreed to purchase 900,000 acres of western Washington timberlands from the Northern Pacific Railway Company. George S. Long, the company's first manager, originated the idea of timber as a renewable resource. In 1936, Phil Weyerhaeuser proudly pronounced the origination of the company's program of growing trees for harvesting, his personal vision. In 1941, Clemons Tree Farm was dedicated as the first of its kind. (" A History of Pierce County, Washington" Vol. 1)
D88074-12
Date: 01-20-19557 of 23:
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Series: D88074   Image#: 12   Date: 01-20-1955
Informal office photos of John Philip (Phil) Weyerhaeuser Jr., President of Weyerhaeuser Timber Company, with a model of the Everett facility. Phil Weyerhaeuser arrived in Tacoma in 1933 to take over the reins of the family timber business, after spending almost 13 years learning the profession in the Inland Empire. He ran the company until his death from leukemia December 8, 1956. He was a private, unpretentious and shy man, but he guided his company through the Great Depression, World War II and the New Deal. He imprinted the company with his vision that it must change in order to survive. No longer just a dealer in timberlands, the company diversified its interests and invested heavily in forestry as a renewable resource. In a 1955 passport application, he listed his profession as "lumberman," a modest assessment of his contributions to the industry. ("Phil Weyerhaeuser Lumberman" by Charles E. Twining)
D155701-12R
Date: 02-04-19698 of 23:
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Series: D155701   Image#: 12R   Date: 02-04-1969
Men attending a Weyerhaeuser conference look extremely happy at the thought of an upcoming coffee break, especially when announced by two smiling college cheerleaders. Employees were listening to speakers at Thompson Hall on the campus of the University of Puget Sound on February 4, 1969. Photograph ordered by the Weyerhaeuser Co. SSPA - 04-FEB-2012
D155701-11R
Date: 02-02-19699 of 23:
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Series: D155701   Image#: 11R   Date: 02-02-1969
Weyerhaeuser Co. sales managers from all over the nation met for their "Big W Homecoming" using both the Winthrop Hotel and the University of Puget Sound in the early part of February, 1969. George H. Weyerhaeuser, president and chief executive officer, points out the large "W" on a men's jacket. The nearly 100 managers from the wood products group were in Tacoma for a three-day conference where they would discuss sales objectives, marketing strategies and recap 1968, the best sales year in the history of the wood products group. Photograph ordered by the Weyerhaeuser Co. (TNT 2-2-69, B-8)
D155298-8
Date: 02-04-196910 of 23:
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Series: D155298   Image#: 8   Date: 02-04-1969
Six unidentified peppy cheerleaders flashed big smiles as they prepared to lead cheers in early February, 1969, at the Weyerhaeuser Co. festivities held at the Winthrop Hotel. The girls are believed to be from the University of Washington. Weyerhaeuser's Big "W" homecoming ran several days at both the Winthrop and at the University of Puget Sound. Nearly 100 sales managers from the wood products group met to discuss sales and marketing strategies and recap a very profitable 1968 year of business for Weyerhaeuser. Photograph ordered by Weyerhaeuser Co. (TNT 2-2-69, B-8)
D141024-9
Date: 03-03-196411 of 23:
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Series: D141024   Image#: 9   Date: 03-03-1964
A man is photographed on March 3, 1964, studiously perusing a Drop-in Art sheet from the Weyerhaeuser Registered Home Advertising Service. Besides the Drop-in Art sheets, proof & tear sheets, Weyerhaeuser ads, home designs, and art pages were available along with the large Advertising Catalog. Photograph ordered by the Weyerhaeuser Co.
C90038-1
Date: c.190012 of 23:
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Series: C90038   Image#: 1   Date: c.1900
Frederick Weyerhaeuser, founder of the Weyerhaeuser Timber Co. Frederick Weyerhaeuser came to the U.S. from Germany as a penniless teenager. He ended up in Rock Island, Illinois, in 1856 working in a lumberyard. In the wake of the panic of 1857, he became the owner of a little sawmill. He expanded first northward and later westward, founding his family empire. He went into the lumber business with his brother-in-law Frederick Carl August Denkmann. In 1900, after long negotiations, the Weyerhaeuser syndicate purchased 900,000 acres of Washington timberlands from the Northern Pacific Railroad. Although a daring and adventurous businessman with boundless energy, Weyerhaeuser was also a painfully private and simple man. The patriarch of the Weyerhaeusers was devoted to hard work and the founding of a dynasty. At his death on April 4, 1914 of pneumonia, he left $30,000,000 and a empire of timberlands. ("Phil Weyerhaeuser Lumberman" by Charles E. Twining)
A142542-2
Date: 08-25-196413 of 23:
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Series: A142542   Image#: 2   Date: 08-25-1964
Hollowed log with numbered wood samples on display in lobby of the Tacoma Building, Weyerhaeuser headquarters, on August 25, 1964. Log's rough bark contrasts with smooth, finished wood product samples contained within. Photograph ordered by Weyerhaeuser Co.
D99952-10
Date: 06-19-195614 of 23:
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Series: D99952   Image#: 10   Date: 06-19-1956
Douglas Fir Plywood Association, 20th annual meeting. The Plywood and Veneer safety award is being presented to Williard Burrell of Weyerhauser by A.P. Stinchfield. Weyerhauser Timber's branch in Springfield Oregon was being presented the 1955 award for its low incidence of accidents. The trophy resembling a roller perched on a block of wood is the Carleton L. Smith Memorial Safety Award.
D63172-6
Date: 12-21-195115 of 23:
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Series: D63172   Image#: 6   Date: 12-21-1951
A studio portrait of Ray A. Dingman. Ordered by Weyerhaeuser Timber Company.
D142208-2
Date: 07-00-196416 of 23:
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Series: D142208   Image#: 2   Date: 07-00-1964
Studio display of Weyerhaeuser registered Home Mortgage Calculator. Made out of paper, the mortgage calculator would be easy for a homeowner to operate and figure out which plan would be better financially. It is apparently based on a 6% loan with mortgages running from 20 - 30 years. An envelope and additional mortgage calculator are out of focus in the background.
D141491-8
Date: 04-00-196417 of 23:
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Series: D141491   Image#: 8   Date: 04-00-1964
Weyerhaeuser advertising. A model in graduate's cap and horn rimmed glasses perched low on her nose points with a ruler to a cartoon drawing touting the merits of Weyerhaeuser's drier, lighter products. There is a wooden toy freight car by her side.
D139331-9
Date: 09-23-196318 of 23:
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Series: D139331   Image#: 9   Date: 09-23-1963
Five unidentified men stand outside of a Weyerhaeuser Co. building believed to be part of their warehouse operations on September 23, 1963. Weyerhaeuser may have furnished the wood for production of plywood Santas in time for the Christmas season. Photograph ordered by Cole & Weber Advertising.
D138423-7
Date: 05-00-196319 of 23:
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Series: D138423   Image#: 7   Date: 05-00-1963
May, 1963, studio portrait of unidentified model displaying Weyerhaeuser's "Building & Remodeling Book." Written by Harry Walter, former home workshop editor of Popular Science Monthly, and published by Popular Library, the paperback contained 65 fascinating home improvement ideas. Complete, easy-to-do plans were included in this practical guide--four do-it-yourself garages, unique children's room, 28 new fences and space-deck backyard were just a few. For 50 cents, the reader could acquaint himself with fresh new ideas to improve a home and see the latest in new wood products. Photograph ordered by the Weyerhaeuser Co.
D138423-10
Date: 05-00-196320 of 23:
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Series: D138423   Image#: 10   Date: 05-00-1963
Cropped May, 1963, photograph of a woman, glove removed, who is removing a copy of Weyerhaeuser's "Building & Remodeling Book" from its cardboard stand. The handy pocket-sized book retailed for 50 cents. Harry Walton, formerly of Popular Science Monthly, used his expertise in home workshop to detail 65 fascinating ideas for home improvement. The easy-to-do plans focused on using wood products and included an attic guest room, hi-fi wall, four-way closet, and modern carports. Photograph ordered by Weyerhaeuser Co.
New Search | Search Request = [subjects contains Weyerhaeuser Timber Co. and Tacoma ] | Edit this search
More pages of thumbnail results 1 2 next>
Displaying thumbnails 1 to 20 of 23 hits
New Search | Search Request = [subjects contains Weyerhaeuser Timber Co. and Tacoma ] | Edit this search
Displaying thumbnails 1 to 20 of 23 hits
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