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New Search | Search Request = [subjects contains Haddaway Hall and Tacoma ] | Edit this search
Displaying thumbnails 1 to 20 of 20 hits
D34612-53
Date: 08-00-19481 of 20:
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Series: D34612   Image#: 53   Date: 08-00-1948
This birds eye view of the old Weyerhaeuser mansion, "Haddaway Hall", at 4301 North Stevens St. and the surrounding area was taken in 1948. By then the estate, which had changed hands several times, was in the possesion of the Dominican Sisters of Marymount, who operated it as a school, Tacoma Catholic College, and as a convent. Completed in 1922, the Elizabethan English Tudor home was built for lumber baron John Philip Weyerhaeuser and his wife Anna. The name comes from Weyerhaeuser's comment that Anna always "had her way," so the home became "Haddaway Hall." The estate consisted of the main house, carriage house, greenhouses and the servant quarters house (now 4224 No. Stevens.) It was surrounded by 8 acres of grounds. The formal gardens were designed by the Olmstead brothers, Frederick Law and Charles, and were brought to life by T.B. Morrow. It was built on the site of the former Allen C. Mason mansion and Whitworth College. It is now the home of the Northwest Baptist Seminary, and is on both the City and National Registry of historic buildings.
24-9
Date: ca. 19352 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 9   Date: ca. 1935
John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall", F.B. Meade and James Hamilton, of Cleveland, Ohio, Architects. View of tree lined driveway and gardens. The 5 1/2 acre gardens were designed by the Olmsted brothers, John Frederick and Charles, to resemble an English country estate. The naturalistic park was rooted in the idea that the gardens should be a civilized and uplifting alternative to the crushing inhumanity of the industrial city. Names given to segments of this park-like design were the Blue Garden, the Walled Garden, English Rose Garden and Heather-and-Juniper Terrace. (TNT 5/30/1923; Landmarks Vol.2. No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historical significances" by William Collins) (Argentum, filed with H)
24-8
Date: ca. 19353 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 8   Date: ca. 1935
John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall", F.B. Meade and James Hamilton, of Cleveland, Ohio, Architects. The famed Olmsted brothers were the landscape architects. Frederick Law Olmsted Jr. is widely recognized as the father of landscape architecture. A few of his most recognized designs are New York City's Central Park and the US Capital grounds in Washington, D.C. View of the walled rose garden at Haddaway Hall. Olmsted's design for the Weyerhaeusers consisted of 42 detailed drawings of all aspects of the 5 1/2 acre grounds. The full intent of the landscape plan was never achieved; the family sold the house before the topiary gardens were planted. Tennis courts now occupy the topiary garden site. The kitchen garden, rose garden and peripheral landscape were completed. ("Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historic significances" by William Collins in "Landmarks" Vol.2, No. 4)
24-7
Date: ca. 19354 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 7   Date: ca. 1935
John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall". Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., Charles Olmsted and T.B. Morrow, Landscape Architects, 1922. Extensive view of gardens looking down from patio to rose gardens, trees and shrubs and out to Commencement Bay. The five and 1/2 acres of gardens were designed by the Olmsteds to resemble those of an English manor home. (TNT 5/30/1923; Landmarks Vol.2. No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historical significances" by William Collins)
24-6
Date: ca. 19355 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 6   Date: ca. 1935
The John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall. Landscaping designed by the Olmsted brothers, Frederick Law Jr. and Charles, Landscape Architects, in 1922. View of perennial gardens bordering a brick path. The landscape architect who brought the Olmsted design, expressed in 42 drawings, into reality was T.B. Morrow. He trained in the parks and famous gardens of Great Britain and had been for twelve years a leading landscape architect in Victoria, B.C. In order to give the landscape a lush aspect, fully grown and blooming plants, trees and shrubs were transplanted here. (TNT 5/30/1923)
24-5
Date: ca. 19356 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 5   Date: ca. 1935
John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall", F.B. Meade and James Hamilton, of Cleveland, Ohio, Architects; Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. and Charles Olmsted, Landscape Architects, 1922. The mansion is built of brick with wood accents. Attention has been paid to the tiniest architectural detail. On the west side of the center is a massive chimney system for the various fireplaces. When viewed from above, the interlocking chimneys form a diamond shape; a shape which is used throughout the exterior of the structure, as is the dogwood motif. ("Landmarks" Vol.2, No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historic significances" by William Collins)
24-4
Date: ca. 19357 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 4   Date: ca. 1935
John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall", F.B. Meade and James Hamilton, of Cleveland, Ohio, Architects; Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr. and Charles Olmsted, Landscape Architects, 1922. The main house is 120 feet long and 55 feet wide, at its widest point. The east end of the residence has on the first floor a solarium, with Gothic arched French doors and a red brick floor, which once gave a direct view of Mt. Rainier. A chapel now stands on the grounds east of the main house, blocking the view southeastward. The remainder of the first floor contains the pantry, meat room , butler's pantry with walk in silver vault, elevator, ice room, kitchen and entry hall, vault ceiling library and living room. ("Landmarks" Vol.2, No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historic significances" by William Collins)
24-3
Date: ca. 19358 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 3   Date: ca. 1935
"Haddaway Hall," the grand home of J.P. and Anne Weyerhaeuser can be seen peeking over the sloping grounds of the great estate. The home was designed to resemble an English Manor. The gardens were designed by renowned landscape architects Frederick Law Jr. and Charles Olmsted. The park was intended as "an uplifting alternative to the crushing inhumanity of the industrial city." The home was completed in 1923 at the astronomical cost of $100,000. The completion of the grounds and interiors were estimated to bring that cost to 1/2 million. The home is built of brick with wood accents. It has 16 principal rooms, most having sweeping views of Commencement Bay and the surrounding mountains. ("Landmarks" Vol.2, No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historic significances" by William Collins)
24-2
Date: ca. 19359 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 2   Date: ca. 1935
"Haddaway Hall," the Tudor style estate of John Philip Weyerhaeuser and his second wife Anne. The brick structure was completed in 1923 from a design by Cleveland architects F.B. Meade & James Hamilton. It was built at a cost of $100,000 on the site of the former Allen C. Mason residence, a home that was later used as part of Whitworth College. The home and gardens covered 8 acres. The gardens were designed by famed landscape architects Frederick Jr. and Charles Olmsted. After the death of J.P. Weyerhaeuser in 1936, it was sold to George G. Franklin, of the Franklin Food Store chain, for $26,000 and back taxes. Property values had been greatly devalued by the Depression. The home is now the location of the Northwest Baptist Seminary. It is on the city, as well as the national registry. (TNT 5/30/1923; Landmarks Vol.2. No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historical significances" by William Collins)
24-19
Date: ca. 193510 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 19   Date: ca. 1935
John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall", F.B. Meade and James Hamilton, of Cleveland, Ohio, Architects, 1922. Paneled dining room with fireplace. The English dining room overlooked the bay. From the dining room lead the butler's pantry, the kitchen, the ice closet and the scullery. (TNT 5/30/1923; Landmarks Vol.2. No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historical significances" by William Collins)
24-17
Date: ca. 193511 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 17   Date: ca. 1935
John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall", F.B. Meade and James Hamilton, of Cleveland, Ohio, Architects, 1922. The great hall, with its outstanding view of the Commencement Bay and the mountains. The walls are richly paneled of dark finished oak. The living room also contained a pipe organ. (TNT 5/30/1923; Landmarks Vol.2. No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historical significances" by William Collins)
24-16
Date: ca. 193512 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 16   Date: ca. 1935
John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall", F.B. Meade and James Hamilton, of Cleveland, Ohio, Architects, 1922. Library with coved, paneled ceiling and built in leaded-glass bookcases. The library is especially noted for its vaulted ceiling, imported from a European castle. Window seats call for dawdling with a good book in the Spring sunshine. (TNT 5/30/1923; Landmarks Vol.2. No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historical significances" by William Collins)
24-14
Date: ca. 193513 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 14   Date: ca. 1935
John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall", F.B. Meade and James Hamilton, of Cleveland, Ohio, Architects, 1922. Wood paneled entrance hall and stairway. A grand stairway with a carved balusters leads to the second floor, noteworthy for its gold leaf chandeliers and cedar lined closets. The stairway is overlooked by a group window made up of 10 separate windows of leaded glass. (TNT 5/30/1923; Landmarks Vol.2. No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historical significances" by William Collins)
24-11
Date: ca. 193514 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 11   Date: ca. 1935
John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall", F.B. Meade and James Hamilton, of Cleveland, Ohio, Architects. View of the carriage house and what appears to be a greenhouse to the left of the picture. The carriage house is detailed similarly to the great house, with parking for automobiles beneath and the chauffer's quarters on the second floor. Heat is provided to the main house and greenhouse from a boiler in the basement of the carriage house. (TNT 5/30/1923; Landmarks Vol.2. No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historical significances" by William Collins)
24-10
Date: ca. 193515 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 10   Date: ca. 1935
John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall", F.B. Meade and James Hamilton, of Cleveland, Ohio, Architects; Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., Charles Olmsted & T.B. Morrow, Landscape Architects, 1922. View of tree lined drive and neighboring house. The drive enters the estate from Stevens Street and curves past the greenhouses, walled garden and English garden. The landscape design by the Olmsted brothers is probably the most notable design element about the home. The structure was also built at the peak of the big house period, when the Pacific Northwest saw most of the affluent construction in its cities. Shortly thereafter, homes of this magnitude were considered ostentatious, and as the Depression loomed, impossible for an individual family to maintain. (TNT 5/30/1923; Landmarks Vol.2. No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historical significances" by William Collins)
24-1
Date: ca. 193516 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 1   Date: ca. 1935
The grounds of the Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall", built for John Philip Weyerhaeuser and his second wife Anna Mary Holbrook. Lawn slope and evergreen trees. J. P. Weyerhaeuser was the president of Weyerhaeuser Timber Company. His second wife was a very strong-will individual who supplied much of the driving force behind the family. The name of the estate derived from J.P. Weyerhaeuser's saying that his wife always "had her way." She asked for a great home and gardens in the style of an English manor. The 5 1/2 acre gardens were designed by the Olmsted brothers, Charles and Frederick Law Jr., and planted by T.B. Morrow. Fully grown trees were transplanted to replicate the English countryside. The home and estate were built at the turning point of Tacoma's great houses. At the time of J.P. Weyerhaeuser's death in 1936, the house was put up for sale; his descendants feeling that it was too ostentatious and hard to maintain. (TNT 5/30/1923; Landmarks Vol.2. No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historical significances" by William Collins)
D23307-7
Date: 08-14-194617 of 20:
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Series: D23307   Image#: 7   Date: 08-14-1946
Miss Mary Catherine McDonald has set September 2, 1946 as the date for her marriage to Edward Charles Davis. Mary Catherine is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William McDonald of Tacoma. Edward is the son of Harry Lee Davis of Chicago, Illinois. She stands on the stairway at Haddaway Hall with her train spread on the steps around her. Handsome woodwork adorns the stairway. Large windows behind her look out into tree tops.
24-13
Date: ca. 193518 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 13   Date: ca. 1935
John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall", F.B. Meade and James Hamilton, of Cleveland, Ohio, Architects; Frederick Law Olmstead, Jr., Charles Olmstead and T.B. Morrow, Landscape Architects, 1922. Full front view of English Tudor house and gardens. The residence is built of brick with wood accent on the exterior. The exterior is accented by six and eight foot high buttresses edged and capped with sandstone blocks. Wood accents each window and each dormer is inlaid with wood. Dogwood patterns are found as accents both on the exterior and interior. Gabled dormers and crenelated parapeted projections adorn the south facing entry. Most of the parapets are capped with lead sheets. The main house is 120 feet long and 55 feet wide at its widest point. It consists of three floors and a full basement, with an outlying carriage house and greenhouses. The main house had 16 principal rooms, lighted with tall lead glass windows. (TNT 5/30/1923; Landmarks Vol.2. No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historical significances" by William Collins) TPL-9770
24-12
Date: ca. 193519 of 20:
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Series: 24   Image#: 12   Date: ca. 1935
John Philip and Anna Weyerhaeuser estate "Haddaway Hall", F.B. Meade and James Hamilton, of Cleveland, Ohio, Architects. View of main entrance and fireplace chimneys. The home was built on the site of the Allen C. Mason residence and the former location of Whitworth College. The home cost $100,000 to construct in 1922. The total 8 acre estate, with the completed landscaping and interiors of the home, was estimated to have cost 1/2 million dollars. It was sold after the Weyerhaeusers' deaths in 1936 to George G. Franklin, of Franklin Food Stores, for $26,000 plus back taxes. The Franklins renamed the home Seamount. The family did not live there long after repeated kidnapping threats. The home was later occupied by Tacoma Catholic College for girls and convent (from 1942-1968), University of Puget Sound Honors dormitory and the current tenant, the Northwest Baptist Seminary (1974-present.) The home is on the city and national registry of historical homes. (TNT 5/30/1923; Landmarks Vol.2. No. 4 "Tacoma's Weyerhaeuser residence: its various historical significances" by William Collins)
A-1718
Date: 09-00-192620 of 20:
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Series: A   Image#: 1718   Date: 09-00-1926
Interior of the sunroom at the Weyerhaeuser mansion. The home that John Philip Weyerhaeuser built for his wife Anna at 4301 No. Stevens was completed in 1922. It was designed by Meade & Hamilton of Cleveland. The Weyerhaeusers called it "Haddaway Hall," in honor of the fact that in matters concerning the house, Mrs. Weyerhaeuser always "Had her way." (WSHS)
New Search | Search Request = [subjects contains Haddaway Hall and Tacoma ] | Edit this search
Displaying thumbnails 1 to 20 of 20 hits
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